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Can graphite burn

Graphite is carbon; why can't it burn like coal? First, combustion is a chemical property, a chemical reaction that emits light and heat between combustibles and combustion-supporting substances. Therefore, this issue must be viewed at the molecular level. In short, whether Graphite will burn in air, even if it has reached the ignition point, depends on the presence or absence of combustion-supporting gases, which naturally do not burn when heated with absolute oxygen. Graphite can be burned, but the combustion conditions are more stringent than coal. The ignition point of coal can be 300-700 depending on the type of coal; The molecular structure of Graphite is more stable, with an ignition point of 720-800 in pure oxygen (the ignition point of fine graphite powder with a mesh size of 200 to 300 can be reduced to below 600 , close to the ignition point of pulverized coal), and 850 to 1000 in air. In addition, considering the excellent thermal conductivity of Graphite, even if a 1000 fire source is used for local heating, the heat will also be quickly conducted and diffused, making the local area of Graphite unable to reach the combustion point. So Graphite is not non-combustible; it's just not easy to ignite. Coal is a mixture of various chemical substances, and its main component is an organic polymer composed of large aromatic rings with "fat side chains" and fused rings. The main skeleton of these fused rings is composed of carbon elements, with an approximate chemical formula of more than two carbon rings, with other elements hanging outside the ring, similar to the structure shown above. It can be seen that coal and Graphite are not the same molecules. Although the main component is carbon, whether Graphite can burn has nothing to do with coal. If you are looking for high quality, high purity and cost-effective graphite, or if you require the latest price of graphite, please feel free to email contact mis-asia.

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