Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Civil liberties groups slam EU data retention as unnecessary

Jennifer Baker | Sept. 28, 2011
A large group of digital rights organizations has demanded proof from the European Commission that the retention of data in the European Union is necessary and proportionate for fighting serious crime.

“By how many percent did the number of condemnations, acquittals or the closure or discontinuation of serious crime cases increase or decrease as a result of blanket data retention legislation or its absence?”

“As some Member States do not have a definition of serious crime, The far-reaching consequences of not strictly defining 'serious crime' in the Directive have been illustrated clearly in Poland, where authorities accessed communications data more than 1 million times in 2009, using the retained data far beyond the prosecution of 'serious crimes' – even in civil proceedings. Alarmingly, the Commission recently seemed to argue that the telecommunication data retained only for the investigation and prosecution of serious crime can also be used in order to investigate intellectual property-related offences, that might not even be crimes, let alone serious crimes,” concluded the civil liberties groups.

The Data Retention Directive first came into force in 2006 and the European Commission currently working on a revision of the law.


 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for MIS Asia eNewsletters.