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How Spotify uses automation and microservices to gain speed advantage on larger rivals

Matthew Finnegan | Sept. 7, 2016
Putting code into production quickly and effectively is key to its operations

Spotify is relatively small, however, when compared to rivals in the online music market like Google, Apple and Amazon.

So how does it ensure that it can keep pace with the development of new features, while scaling operations globally to meet customer demand?

Speaking at an EMC-hosted event in Gothenburg last week, Spotify's principal engineer, Niklas Gustavsson said that putting code into production quickly and effectively is key to its operations, and the way that the business organises its development teams is crucial.

"We have chosen to optimise for speed of delivery," said Gustavsson. "The main reason behind this is that we are in a highly competitive and complicated market and we think that we can win by being faster than our competitors."

"Some of our competitors are much bigger companies, so we can't beat them on that. The way that we can be faster than we otherwise could is by having highly autonomous delivery teams."

Gustavsson said that this involves giving each team a well-defined mission they can act on: "That might be to make the best search product in the world, or the best music stream quality product in the world. Or it might be things like growing our subscriber base or building APIs for third parties."

Spotify splits its development teams into groups on a number of levels - the three main ones being 'squads', 'tribes' and 'chapters'. "The most important team we optimise for is the squad. A squad is the team that produces a feature - so the search team or the audio quality. In your usual agile methodology this would be a scrum team."

'Squads' are designed to operate independently of each other to avoid bottlenecks in development. "That is the man idea - by making teams as independent as we can, they won't be blocking each other. Each team can execute on their own."

'Chapters' focus on each individual's personal development. "That is where we are trying to build strong engineers or strong QA, for example," said Gustavsson - while 'tribes' arrange both of these group into a wider project, and "are supposed to work independently as a startup within the company".

Individual 'squads' are also held responsible for the code that they put into production, building and deploying software, then managing the machine it is running on.

"A very common theme in the way we evolve our organisation is the way we go from centralised teams to distributed functionality," Gustavsson said. "A good example is the way we run our operations and make sure that our production and live environment stays up and working."

"This also solves another problem, which is that they have a good feedback cycle, where, if you produce shitty software, [the creator] will be the one being woken up in the middle of the night, as opposed to someone else."

 

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