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How Spotify uses automation and microservices to gain speed advantage on larger rivals

Matthew Finnegan | Sept. 7, 2016
Putting code into production quickly and effectively is key to its operations

Another way to allow its developers to move quickly is to adopt microservice architectures for applications, breaking them down into smaller, interlinking components. This allows the business to move "much, much faster" than it would otherwise.

"The nice thing is that this decouples teams," Gustavsson explained. "When I deploy a new version of my software [] I don't need to go coordinate with a bunch of other teams and figure out when we are able to find a good time to deliver. I can deliver whenever I want."

"So a team at Spotify might be deploying into production tens or hundreds of times per day if they like."

The microservices approach fits in with one of Spotify's main goals - to automate as many processes it can.

"When it comes to the way that we build things technologically-wise, we want to automate as much as possible, basically everything," he said. "We don't want to do manual provisioning of servers, we don't want to do manual employment of software, everything should be automated."

There are also benefits for site reliability: "It also raises quality quite a bit because humans can be pretty stupid, so we will fail much more often. If there is something that we can automate, then that will dramatically reduce the failure rate, so that is what we are trying to do."

 

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