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It's the ecosystem, stupid: Why Apple's latest OS's complete each other

Dan Moren | July 1, 2016
With iOS 10, macOS Sierra, and watchOS 3, we've gone beyond the stage of Apple products simply working better with other Apple products, and more into them actively working together.

You see what I'm getting at: it's all connected. 

It's no longer simply about Apple controlling the hardware and software but about your whole ecosystem working on Apple (or Apple-compatible) devices. The seeds of this have, of course, been long sown, but over the past few years in particular, it's become a more and more prevalent theme of Apple's yearly releases.

It's no longer simply about Apple controlling the hardware and software but about your whole ecosystem working on Apple (or Apple-compatible) devices.

We've gone beyond the stage of Apple products simply working better with other Apple products, and more into them actively working together. Features like Handoff, for example, and all of the other technologies closely linked to it-AirDrop, the new Auto Unlock and Universal Clipboard features-add extrafunctionality that's only available on Apple's platforms. And, more to the point, those features that exist in the space between our devices have become among the most attractive new features that Apple is rolling out.

The next generation 

All of that is a smart move that provides a strong reason for people to invest heavily in a single ecosystem where things work seamlessly together. And it's not as though Apple doesn't traffic in standards where such things are available: the web, email, Wi-Fi, USB, and so on. (There are also plenty of places where things are currently a murky mess of competing standards and technologies, such ashome automation.) 

But to my mind Apple hasn't yet gone far enough when it comes to expanding the capabilities that this inter-device operation could offer. I could, for example, use Hey Siri on my phone and tell it to skip to a certain point in the video I'm watching on my Apple TV. Or have my Apple Watch notify me when I get up and start to leave some place without remembering to take my phone. Or tell Siri on my iPhone to display something-a webpage, a document-on my iMac or Apple TV, and have it understand what I mean. 

None of these features are especially farfetched when you consider the state of Apple's ecosystem today, but as our technology becomes more and more embedded-and, hopefully, more transparent-in our lives, these coordinated abilities among them is going to become ever more important.

Source: Macworld 

 

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