Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Intel's siloed business units unify around IoT and connectivity

Agam Shah | Sept. 9, 2016
Intel second-in-command Venkata Renduchintala has set his goals: Use IoT to connect devices and the company's business units

As client devices generate more information, data centers will need the backplane systems and infrastructure to handle the growing data traffic. Wireless networks will need to transform to be able to deal with the explosion in data rates.

For that, Intel is focusing heavily on 5G, which will blur the lines between types of wireless networks. There will be a bigger demand for faster uplink and downlink speeds from all kinds of devices like drones, robots, smart home devices and connected devices in factories, for example, Renduchintala said.

"We're going to see essentially a much greater pervasiveness of client devices populating the markets," he said. "If you think about autonomous vehicles or delivering health services over a mobile network, you need to be able to make life-or-death decisions based on that."

5G is still under development and expected to go live by 2020. Intel has a robust lineup of modems and wireless products it is building for 5G, Renduchintala said.

IoT will be more pervasive with 5G, giving companies the ability for sensor devices to communicate at longer ranges. Today, most sensors devices can communicate within a limited range of Wi-Fi, ZigBee, or Bluetooth.

Because Intel has a history of promoting insiders to new positions, some critics questioned if Renduchintala would succeed in his new position, but he's put Intel back on track quickly. As an outsider, Murthy wasn't influenced by attachments to specific initiatives. He cut projects, redirected resources to growing areas, and made decisions in a transparent manner after debate and discussion.

Some Intel decisions weren't popular and ultimately, projects were cut, and people were laid off. But some tough decisions were needed to maintain profitability, growth, and relevance.

"As long as you can walk people through your thinking, you can take what was very controversial and make it very logical," Renduchintala said.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for MIS Asia eNewsletters.