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Australian businesses could have done more to protect themselves in 2013: Symantec

Patrick Budmar | Dec. 6, 2013
Security vendor also foresees increased connectivity to lead to more vulnerabilities next year.

Australian companies did not take the necessary steps to protect their data security in 2013, according to Symantec Pacific region vice-president and managing director, Brenton Smith.

For Smith, this is at odds with at what is happening with the BYOD trend.

"The 2013 Norton Report showed that close to half of all working adults in Australia are using their personal device for both work and play," he said.

"Additionally, 32 per cent of working adults claimed their company had no policy on the use of personal devices for work."

As for why this is the case, Smith said it is likely that Australian companies either do not have a BYOD policy in place, or are failing to educate their staff about the existence of one.

No shortage of attack vectors
The "Internet of things" is a term that has often been heard throughout the year, but in 2014 Smith expects it to morph into the "Internet of vulnerabilities."

Ransomware, mobile cyber crime, app scams, exploiting niche social networks, and corporate espionage are some of the things Smith warns against, as well as the move from mass cyber threats to more sophisticated and targeted attacks.

"There is no doubt that cyber crime and privacy will continue to be problematic for consumers and enterprises, both large and small," he said.

Smith adds that mobile apps in 2014 will also prove that "you can actually like yourself too much."

 

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