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Gartner foresees 250 million connected vehicles on the road by 2020

Lucas Mearian | Jan. 27, 2015
Cars will be connected to other cars, homes and businesses -- and the infrastructure around them.

Connected cars will be a "major" part of the Internet of Things -- from healthcare to the home, Gartner said. A vehicle will be able to talk to wirelessly connected appliances in the home, to say, turn up the heat as you're approaching or warm up the oven. Your steering wheel will be able to take your pulse.

As the amount of information being fed into in-car head unit or telematics systems grows, vehicles will be able to capture and share not only internal systems status and location data, but also changes in surroundings in real time, according to Gartner analyst Thilo Koslowski.

Ultimately, your car will become just another part of your mobile data plan.

Embedded connectivity is being built into new cars to support a variety of safety, telematics, maintenance and infotainment services. The wireless communication module functions as a gateway for those services. The increasing number of sensors and camera modules used throughout a vehicle for a wide range of control, monitoring and automated driving features have the potential to generate a vast amount of data, some of which will be transmitted to the cloud through that gateway.

Telematics services have been an early driver of embedded connectivity in cars and  will continue to play an important role in the evolution of the connected car, Gartner said. Consumer telematics services, such as concierge services and remote door unlocking, have been available for several years.

At the same time, fleet telematics will be used for active monitoring of delivery vehicles to boost efficiency for fleet operators. The increasing penetration of embedded telematics communications modules in new vehicles will also create market opportunities for semiconductor companies supplying wireless modems and baseband integrated circuits.

Enabled by lower-cost cameras, sensors and processors, advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) functions such as forward-collision warning/avoidance and lane departure warning/assist are expanding rapidly from luxury models to more mainstream vehicles. Today's ADAS implementations are largely self-contained; the vehicle senses its surroundings, processes the information and responds with an alert or a control input.

Opening a communication channel to allow these systems to share information with other cars and with roadside infrastructure will make cooperative intelligent traffic systems possible, and pave the way for self-driving vehicles. Cars will be able to report hazards and traffic conditions, select routes to avoid congestion, coordinate with traffic signals to optimize traffic flow and travel in platoons to minimize energy consumption.

 

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