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Microsoft's rollout of Windows 10 gets B+ grade

Gregg Keizer | Aug. 14, 2015
General vibe of the new OS remains positive, say analysts.

Because of the large number of customers eligible for the free upgrade, Microsoft announced it would distribute the code in several waves that would take weeks (according to Microsoft) or months (the consensus of analysts) to complete. While some had predicted that the upgrade's massive audience would stress the delivery system Microsoft had built, or even affect the Internet at large, neither happened.

The "Get Windows 10" app -- which was silently placed on PCs beginning in March -- not only served as a way to queue customers for the upgrade, but also ran compatibility checks to ensure the hardware and software would support the new operating system, another slick move by Microsoft.

"Microsoft rolled out Windows 10 to the audience that would be most receptive," said Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, referring to the Insiders-get-it-first tactic. "Then they rolled it out to those who weren't Insiders, but who had expressed a desire to get the upgrade. And only those [whose devices] passed all of its tests got it. That was a smart thing to do."

The latter was designed to limit upgrade snafus, something Microsoft has chiefly, although not entirely, accomplished. "While the rollout was pretty clean, there have been glitchy issues here and there," said Kleynhans, who cited post-Windows-10-upgrade updates that crippled some consumers' machines.

Moorhead echoed that, highlighting the out-the-gate problem many had keeping Nvidia's graphic drivers up-to-date as Microsoft's and Nvidia's update services tussled over which got to install a driver. "Problems have been more anecdotal than system-wide," Moorhead said. "And they seem to get remedied very quickly."

The bungles haven't been widespread enough to taint the generally favorable impression of Windows 10 generated by social media, news reports and Microsoft's PR machine, the analysts argued.

"Overall, I'd say Windows 10 has received a much more positive reception than other [editions of] Windows," said Moorhead, who said the reaction was justified, since the developing consensus is that Windows 10 is a big improvement over its flop-of-a-predecessor, Windows 8.

"The vibe is positive, but it's much more about consumers now than businesses," said Directions' Miller. Enterprises, he said, will take a wait-and-see approach -- as they always do -- before jumping onto Windows 10, as they must if they're to stick with Microsoft, a given since there isn't a viable alternative.

A credible reaction from corporate customers, Miller continued, won't be visible until Microsoft finishes unveiling its update tracks, called "branches," particularly the "Long-term servicing branch" (LTSB). That branch will mimic the traditional servicing model where new features and functionality will be blocked from reaching systems that businesses don't want to see constantly changing.

 

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