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Interview: BYOD and growth in the enterprise

T.C. Seow | April 23, 2013
Where should CIOs be paying attention to when talking about BYOD and mobile computing? Should they be concerned still about security, or the adverse impact on productivity due to liberal policies on the use of mobile devices within and outside the enterprise? CIO Asia speaks to Accenture for some answers.

Trent Mayberry
Photo: Trent Mayberry

Where should CIOs be paying attention to when talking about BYOD and mobile computing? Should they be concerned still about security, or the adverse impact on productivity due to liberal policies on the use of mobile devices within and outside the enterprise? CIO Asia speaks to Accenture for some answers.

CIO Asia: Security seems to be the key concern of corporate IT chiefs. How can CIOs respond to the rising use of consumer technology in the workplace while managing data security at the same time?
Trent Mayberry: One way for CIOs to respond to the increasing presence of personal devices in the workplace is to develop and communicate a clear set of safe use policies. Providing guidelines that are transparent and accessible to everyone not only ensures that data security is enforced throughout the organisation, but also that employees feel accountable for what they do.

In addition, the organisation should put in place technology to manage access to corporate data from personal devices, often called Mobile Device Management (MDM) and Mobile Application Management (MAM).

Is there clear correlation between talent satisfaction/productivity and use of personal technology in Singapore and ASEAN region?
While we see no clear correlation at this point, our study has shown that more employees believe that the use of personal technology has enhanced their productivity. Research by Accenture on the consumerisation of IT shows that a majority of Singapore respondents agreed that consumer IT enhanced their productivity (60 percent) versus the global average of 49 percent, and led them to be more innovative (63 percent) compared to the global average of 51 percent.

We also see that employees in emerging markets believe more strongly compared to those in developed countries that the use of consumer technologies can make a significant difference in their innovativeness as well as lead to better use of their resources or higher quality work.

In a recent survey conducted by Accenture, we also found that the technology policy of companies is often used in making employment decisions. Clearly, the new employees are considering the benefits of personal technology in making the choice to work with an employer.

What are the key differences between emerging vs. mature markets in the adoption of consumer devices and applications in the workplace?
Accenture's research of more than 4,000 employees from large organisations found significant differences in attitudes and usage patterns in terms of the use of consumer IT for business purposes across the globe.

Adoption of consumer tools and applications in the workplace, for instance, is more prevalent in emerging markets than in mature markets. Employees in Brazil, Russia, India and Mexico are twice as likely to use a consumer technology in the workplace as their counterparts in mature economies, such as Germany or France, whose usage rates are below 10 per cent.

 

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