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Google and Apple make mobile privacy an xxymoron

Damon Brown | Feb. 20, 2012
Google and Apple talk up security, but recent disclosures serve as a painful reminder of how much control mobile phone users give up when they power on their handsets.

And earlier this week, Apple was asked by the U.S. government if its approved apps fell short of protecting user data. The social networking app Path was caught uploading whole address books without permission, but users realized that Facebook, Twitter, and other popular apps have been doing the same thing all along.

After the nudge by lawmakers in Washington, Apple immediately enforced its policy, requiring all iOS apps to update their permissions, but why wasn't it enforcing it in the first place? It's probably the same reason why Google has been secretly tracking us: In these days of voluntary information sharing, it believes it can get away with it.

On Thursday, Google said it was working on a Chrome password generator so you won't have to worry about remembering and typing in passwords on any device. Google would ultimately become the gatekeeper between you and your favorite sites, not to mention knowing your passwords.

It is an ironic end to a privacy-deflating week.

 

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