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HomeNewsAsiaWorldwide demand for graphite steadily increased throughout 2012 and into 2013

Worldwide demand for graphite steadily increased throughout 2012 and into 2013

Worldwide demand for graphite steadily increased throughout 2012 and into 2013. This increase resulted from the improvement of global economic conditions and its impact on industries that use graphite. Principal import sources of natural graphite were, in descending order of tonnage, China, Mexico, Canada, Brazil, and Madagascar, which combined accounted for 97% of the cargo and 90% of the value of total imports. Mexico and Vietnam provided all the amorphous graphite, and Sri Lanka provided all the lump and chippy dust variety. In descending order of cargo, China, Canada, and Madagascar were the major suppliers of crystalline flake and flake dust graphite. In 2013, China produced the majority of the world's graphite. Graphite production increased in China, Madagascar, and Sri Lanka from 2012, while production decreased in Brazil from 2012 production levels.

Because graphite flakes slip over one another, giving it its greasy feel, graphite has long been used as a lubricant in applications where "wet" lubricants, such as oil, can not be used. Technological changes are reducing the need for this application. Natural graphite is used mostly in what are called refractory applications. Refractory applications involve extremely high heat and demand materials that will not melt or disintegrate under such extreme conditions. One example of this use is in the crucibles used in the steel industry. Such refractory applications account for the majority of the usage of graphite. It also makes brake linings, lubricants, and molds in foundries. Various other industrial uses account for the remaining graphite consumed each year. If you are looking for high quality, high purity, and cost-effective graphite, or if you require the latest price, please feel free to email contact mis-asia.

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